Monday, June 30, 2014

Something to teach my kids about...

18 English Words You Should Use With Caution (When in Ang Mo Countries)

Here are 18 English words that have a slightly different meaning in Singapore. These words should be used with caution when travelling to English speaking countries.

1. Stone

Singlish Meaning:

Conveying either a lack of any activity, a state of stupor or stunned bewilderment. While it may owe its origins to it, the local use of the term seems to lack any connection with drug-use.

English Meaning:

A state of mind which occurs after smoking enough marijuana to the point where the user stares blankly into whatever catches his/her attention, and giggles.
If you say you are stoned in the UK or the USA you may be hassled for some weed.
usewithcaution

2. Stay

Singlish Meaning:

To live (in a place). From Malay “tinggal”. – “My grandmother, my aunt and uncle also stay next door.”

English Meaning:

Live somewhere temporarily as a visitor or guest. Live is permanent – if you live somewhere, that place is your home, that is where all your things are. If you go away on holiday or on a business trip, you will stay somewhere, most likely a hotel. 
You go on vacation and stay at a hotel, but you live in Tampines.

3. Spoilt

Singlish Meaning:

Broken down. From the Malay word ‘rosak’, which means both ‘broken’ (computer, door etc) and ‘spoilt’ with regards to food.

English Meaning:

1. To ruin. For example: ‘She spoilt the movie by telling us the ending’.
2. To pamper. For example: ‘That boy is so spoilt. His parents buy him everything he asks for’.
3. (Of food) To go off or become bad. For example: ‘That food will spoil if you leave it out’.
Toys break; equipment gets damaged; but food spoils and children are spoilt

4. Send

Singlish Meaning:

To take (i.e. drive) somebody somewhere - “I’ll send you home”.

English Meaning:

Send – cause to go or be taken to a destination. “Send” is used when something (or someone) goes away from you, but you don’t go alongWhen you send a letter, you don’t get into the mailbox and go with it.
Be careful, the assumed ending to the phrase “I’ll send you home”, is one of the following:
  • “in an ambulance”
  • “in a body bag”
  • “in little pieces”

send

5. Last time

Singlish Meaning:

Any event previously, in the past – “Last time, in kampong, we are very poor.

English Meaning:

“Last time” refers to a specific occurrence of something, not something that happened long ago, nor something that happened continually in the past. It cannot refer to a general time in the past. For that we use “previously” or “in the past”. For example, “Last time in class we studied algebra”.
If you said “Last time Romans wore shorts”, you are obviously a time traveling Time Lord. 

lasttime

6. Keep

Singlish Meaning:

Put in order or tidy up. For example “Keep your books” (which means “put your books away”)

English Meaning:

To hold or retain in one’s possession as one’s own. “Please keep the mats” (Take the mats away, you now own them)
Don’t be surprised if someone takes, whatever you asked them to ‘keep’, away with them.

7. Help

Singlish Meaning:

Do something for someone else. “Can you help post these letters” (which means “Can you post these letters”)

English Meaning:

‘Help’ in this form is to give aid or assistance. “Could you help me carry this table.”
The casual phrase “can you help me buy…” or “can you help post these letters” would seem a little strange in native English speaking countries. This sounds like you need assistance or aid, rather than you need someone to do something for you.
If you asked someone to help you buy water, they would think you were unable to perform the task on your own and need assistance in simple shopping transactions.

8. Follow

Singlish Meaning:

To accompany or go with someone. “You follow me” (which means “You can come along with me”)

English Meaning:

To go after someone, to proceed behind or to come after as in pursuit of.
If you said “I’ll follow you”, this would imply that you will walk behind them like a mad stalker.

follow

Keep, Follow, and Help misuse explained 

More Words and Phrases


Word / Phrase

Singlish Meaning:

English Meaning:

9. Bath / Bathe“Go and take your bath! Or “Go and bathe”. To mean go take a shower.To have a bath or bathe in a bathtub.
10. BoringPeople use boring instead of bored. “I think you are boring”To say someone is boring or you are boring has negative connotations regarding personality (uninteresting person).
11. BungalowA detached two or three story home.A type of single-storey house
12. MarketingWhen we go to the market or
supermarket.
Marketing is used to describe what companies do when they promote a product
13. Off dayA day when people do not go to workA day in which you are not at your normal level of performance
14. OutstationWhen you are out of town, or away overseas.You are going off to a station in a remote or sparsely populated location.
15. Pass UpTo give in something to someone. Example “Pass up your homework”Pass up is used when talking about chances or offers to do something
16. RevertReply. “Revert to me at this address.”To regress or go back to a former condition. “Revert to me” literally means they are asking you to become them.
17. TakenTo eat; to have a meal – “Have you taken your lunch?”Taken my lunch where?
18. You know how to eat?Do you eat this kind of dish, and do you like to eat it?Do you know the method or art of eating (e.g. open mouth, insert food, chew, and swallow)?

Sunday, June 8, 2014

7 Things Parents Should Tell Their Kids Every Day

There are many ways to say “I love you” to your children, without actually uttering those three small-but-mighty words. Below are my seven favorite alternatives, which also double-duty as “Empowering Life Philosophies” for raising kids who feel resilient — kids who feel deep inside themselves that they have what it takes to bounce back from life’s assorted (and sordid!) challenges.
After all, let’s face it. No matter how hard we all try to travel a bump-free path to happiness, life will always present its share of surprise potholes.
1. “I believe in you.”
I've told my 3-year-old son, Ari, “I believe in you” so frequently, that he’s started to boomerang these words right back at me.
Funny example: The other day I was ransacking our apartment for my keys. I collapsed on the sofa, frustrated because I couldn’t find them. Suddenly I felt a tug, tug, tug on my yoga pants. It was Ari.
“Mommy,” he says, “I know you can find your keys. I believe in you.”
His words were just the booster shot of adrenaline I needed to stand up and try pulling the sofa away from the wall for a quick peek behind it. Eureka! I found my lost keys!
Yep! I greatly believe in the propulsion power of “I believe in you!”
2. “Never give up.”
Actually, when I say these words to my son, I say them three times in a row, in a silly, exaggerated, Winston-Churchill-type voice: “Never give up! Never give up! Never give up!”
This makes Ari giggle. And laughter is a great stress reliever, which continues to move him forward.
Recently, however, I realized these words need an important addendum. My son and I were putting together a Spiderman puzzle. Ari kept trying to squeeze the wrong puzzle piece into an empty puzzle space — while repeating: “Never give up! Never give up! Never give up!”
I corrected him by saying: “Never give up! Never give up! Never give up! Unless of course you’re doing something which might be wrong — then you need to stop, think and come up with a new strategy!”
“A new strategy?” he asked.
“Yes,” I said, “If you keep doing what you’re doing, you’ll keep getting what you’re getting. If nothing changes, nothing changes. So … you need to look for a new way of doing it, a new strategy, to get new results.”
Ari now recognizes the importance of never giving up, while also being open to seeking new strategies.
3. “Practice is how we learn.”
This phrase reminds Ari not to be upset at himself for slip-ups and downfalls. I like to say this not only during a challenging activity, but also before, as a warmly worded warm up.
4. "Every expert started out as a beginner — just like you."
I feel it’s essential to remind Ari that people who are awesome at something didn’t start off awesome.
I want my son to grow up knowing that it’s OK to make mistakes. It’s OK to fail. It’s OK to struggle. What’s not OK is to think that mistakes, failure and struggle are permanent states of being! They’re simply a bridge you need to keep traveling across to get yourself to “The Land of Awesome.” I want my son to grow up knowing that persistence, patience and effort are all far more important than perfection.
5. “Failure is not an option.”
I received this mantra via one of Ari’s talking ninja toys. When I first heard the toy utter this phrase, I said: “OOOooooooh I love this toy! Failure is not an option! That’s a good one!”
Ari and I then talked a bit about what this phrase means. Now whenever Ari is having trouble doing something, he’ll Ninja-Up and announce: “Failure is not an option!”
6. “You gotta learn from every oopsy and ouchie.”
Each time Ari spills something, breaks something, drops something, kicks something, hurts something — I repeat for him this same little verbal ditty: “You gotta learn from every oopsy and ouchie.” I then ask him to specifically tell me what he learned from whatever the oopsy or ouchie might be — and we talk it through.
I let him know we all make oopsies and ouchies. We just have to try not to make the same oopsy or ouchie more than once.
7. “You are safe and loved.”
I recently added this phrase into my “Resiliency Words Tool Kit” after doing a hypnosis session with my friend. She was trying to put me into a relaxed emotional state. Her strategy? She asked me to remember a time in my childhood when I felt safe and loved. Hoo boy! As soon as she requested this, I tensed up instead of calming down! I couldn’t remember a clear, definitive time in my childhood where I felt safe and loved.
Afterward I thought about how important it is to raise kids to feel safe and loved. It bolsters their self-esteem and encourages courage.
I’ve now added the words “You are safe and loved!” into my goodnight ritual for my son. I whisper these words softly in his ear before he drifts off to sleep. “You are safe and loved.” I truly hope this quiet whisper creates a loud, infinite echo which lasts him long into adulthood.


http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-14052/7-things-parents-should-tell-their-kids-every-day.html